Tag Archives: Rosie-Anne Pinney

Rosie-Anne Pinney – Bookbinder


Our speaker for April, 2016, was Rosie-Anne Pinney, the new owner of Cambria Craft Bindery in Nelson.

Rosie-Anne ready to begin her talk.

Rosie-Anne ready to begin her talk.

Rosie-Anne’s talk covered the history of books and book-binding from Medieval times, the development in the use of materials:  parchment, vellum, paper;  illustration and decoration: illuminated manuscripts, up to Gutenberg and the use of moveable type. With this invention there were more books produced in 50 years than in the preceeding 1,000 years.  His first printed work was a Latin grammar book.

A book bound in calf skin with hand-tooled design, gold decoration, marbeled edges and clasps to keep the pages from wrinkling.

A book bound in calf skin with hand-tooled design, gold decoration, marbeled edges and clasps to keep the pages from wrinkling.

Then came Caxton in 1476 who set up the first printing press in London.  Gold  was used around the edges to protect the surface of the book.  In the 17th and 18th centuries pictures were painted over the edges that were not related to the contents.  Marbeling  was also used.  The books were stored on shelves with the page edges pointing outwards to show these effects.

Elaborate page edge scene decorations.

Elaborate page edge scene decorations.

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What a bookbinder works with.

Mechanisation of book production came in the 19th century and then the Arts and Crafts movement followed as a reaction to this.

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A particularly fine example of an elaborately illuminated cover design.

Rosie-Anne used a power point presentation to very effectively illustrate her talk.

We plan to invite Rosie-Anne to pay us a return visit next year to demonstrate the techniques she uses in her work.

 

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